How to knot a tie

Suddenly, they offered their father a job in a reputable company, called a husband for an urgent meeting, and were late for a friend’s wedding? This is a time when you should show off your skills on how to tie a tie. And here we will not only talk, but we will also show how to tie a tie with images.How to knot a tie….?

How to knot a tie step by step

We will explain how to tie the most popular nodes and the images will help you to visually understand the process. You’re ready Let’s start then.

1. Kent Knot (How to knot a tie)

  1. Position the tie so that the wide part faces the left hand and the narrow part towards the right.
  2. Place the wide end under the strait to form a cross.
  3. Wrap the narrow side with the width from left to right.
  4. Pull the wide end up to the neck and hang it under the collar.
  5. Extend it through the loop on the front that has just formed.
  6. Lower the wide end and crush it lightly.

2. Windsor Knot

  1. Place the tie with the inside seams so that the wide part is facing the right hand and the narrow part towards the left.
  2. The small end should be slightly pulled over the navel.
  3. Place the wide end over the strait to form a cross.
  4. Pull the wide end up to the neck and hang it on the neck of the tie.
  5. After wrapping the collar once, pull it to the left.
  6. Put the narrow end underneath from left to right.
  7. Pull the wide end back towards the neck and hang it on the formed collar.
  8. Then pull the wide end to the right.
  9. Create the front side of the tie knot and place the wide side horizontally from right to left.
  10. Pull the wide end up to the neck and hang it under the collar.
  11. Extend it through the ring at the front of the knot of the ring that formed during the eighth phase.
  12. Lower the wide end and crush it lightly.

3. Four-in-hand Knot

Perhaps the most common of all, thanks to its simplicity and versatility. It is easy to tie, conical and slightly asymmetrical.

  1. Place the tie with the inside seams so that the wide part is facing the right hand and the narrow part towards the left. The small end should be slightly pulled over the navel.
  2. Place the wide end over the strait to form a cross.
  3. Wrap the narrow side with the width from right to left.
  4. Create the front side of the tie knot and place the wide side horizontally from left to right.
  5. Pull the wide end up to the neck and hang it under the collar.
  6. Extend it through the loop at the front of the knot that formed during the fourth step.
  7. Lower the wide end and crush it lightly.

4. Half Windsor Knot

Anyone can say that a Windsor knot is not necessary because there is a Half Windsor knot. All because it is simpler than its “big brother” and looks much more elegant due to its asymmetrical shape. It is also a formal knot that fits most necks and can be used on all types of ties.

5. Victoria Knot

This is often called “four knots in the hand” with an additional twist, because the end of the loop is wrapped four times around the knot and then stretched inside. As a result, it looks broad, but still ideal for office shirts.

6. Diagonal Knot

This is easy to do after you’ve already learned how to do all the previous nodes. The diagonal knot consists of two layers, is asymmetrical and difficult to remove, so it is necessary to loosen it. But it looks very elegant in an intense color tie.

7. Kelvin Knot

This node is named after Lord Calvin, the inventor of the temperature school. However, it is not directly related to Lord Calvin, but it is as difficult to connect as to understand the theories of this scientist. However, it looks fabulous and elegant in fine cotton or wool ties and is best worn in some special events.

8. Balthus Knot

This is one of the broadest knots, invented by the Swiss artist Baltasar Klossowski in the last century. The artist used it in an unusual way, making the wide end short and the long narrow. The Balthus knot is ideal for men who are not too tall, as it hides the length of the tie and levels the proportions of the costume. Looks lovely in light silk ties.

9. Onassis Knot

Aristotle Onassis invented this knot, a Greek businessman and Jackie Kennedy’s second husband. He changed the classic “four-handed knot”, pulling freely on the wide end of the tie instead of fixing it. This knot looks very eccentric and fits perfectly even in women’s fashion. This knot adapts to the bonds with bright and interesting prints.

10. Pratt Knot

The most popular node in the United States, almost all local businessmen and politicians prefer it. It is simple and quite simple to tie. However, it must be remembered that it is tied with an external seam and the collar of the shirt is thought to hide it.

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